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Genevieve's Chicken Liver Parfait

C'est parfait? Yes!

genevieves CL Parfait 3 So, what is the difference between a chicken liver pate and a chicken liver parfait?

dirtykitchensecrets.com advises it is “A chicken liver pate becomes a chicken liver parfait (French for perfect) when the cooked liver mixture is pushed through a sieve to remove any sinewy bits, resulting in a silkier, smoother and luscious liver parfait!” and it all made sense. The first impression of Genevieve’s Chicken Liver Parfait was reminiscent of bottled French terrine or confit. Pates available are usually in plastic tubs at the supermarket, or loose in delis such as Nosh.

One taste of the original Chicken Liver Parfait on toast was enough to verify the English translation of the French “parfait”; it was perfect. The texture is smooth to a fault. The flavour is pronounced and even with subtle overtones or harmonics. It’s a product that firmly positions itself in the quality end of good food. It has clearly been well conceived, ably executed and well packaged.

Genevieve’s Chicken Liver Parfait is the brainchild of Genevieve Knights who is a well-known chef, food writer, author, food stylist and photographer.
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  • You can buy it now at the Westmere Butcher.

    Posted on 19 May 2012 by Ben

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