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Hakanoa Handmade

Hakanoa and Handmade

handmadehakanoa Hakanoa Handmade make their ginger beer with real local ingredients. The fermentation process takes around a week, and the drinks are then bottled in recyclable plastic.

The business is local and sustainable, and was started by Rebekah Hay. The drinks are all organic and preservative free, and flavours much stronger and fresher than mass-produced, carbonated competitors. The Dry Ginger Beer is made from filtered water, organic fairtrade raw sugar, fresh ginger, dried organic ginger, organic sultanas and fresh lemons. Other products include Lime & Chilli Ginger Beer (with fresh chillies!), Ginger Syrup (which can be mixed with hot water to make Hot Ginger Toddy, mixed with milk for a divine ginger latte, or simply added to ice cream), and Spicy Chai, which combines water, ginger, sugar, Black Broken Orange Pekoe tea, cinnamon, pepper, cloves, cardamom and sultanas. Whizz this up with hot milk for an instant chai latte.

As these products are naturally fermented, they are great digestive aids
Beverages / Hakanoa Handmade

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  • Their ginger beer also tastes like shit.

    Posted on 31 July 2012 by Jim

  • Gutless bully. I fucking hate this women!!!

    Posted on 31 July 2012 by qwert

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