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Hardieboys's soft drinks

Naturally fermented ginger beer

Hardieboys gingerbeer3 Rebecca Hardie Boys produces ginger beer the way her mum did, with a few variations, and has had considerable success in doing so.

Her yeast “bug” is fed on ginger powder, but the drink flavouring is fresh ginger, which is grated then juiced. The fizziness is from natural fermentation just like the old home brew and there are no added preservatives. It’s a short shelf life because it’s so fresh and it needs to be kept cold in the cafes and restaurants where you can buy it. Urban Harvest also offers these for sale online.

The success of her ginger beer has led to fermented lemonade and lime drinks, the lemonade using a fermentation process she learned from a Picton-based champagne maker. Only locally used produce is used for her drinks and despite the fact that everyone reaches for a cold drink in summer, we all know the benefits of lemon and ginger for colds, flus and stomach complaints.

There's talk of fejoa and blackberry and cola; we’re looking forward to other products coming from Hardieboys, given how good the current soft drinks are.
  • try calling Urban Ha
Rebecca Hardie Boys, 53 Moores Valley Road, Wanuiomata
Beverages / Soft drinks / Hardieboys's soft drinks

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  • Hi everyone,
    i need the E-mail address from these brewery Rebecca Hardieboy.
    Would be nice. sincerely Lea

    Posted on 16 March 2014 by Lea

  • new cafe opening in cuba street, Te Aro. We are keen to use your products. Please ring me 021 181 3370 to arrange meeting next week. Thanks and hear from you soon.

    Posted on 02 June 2013 by helen le

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