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Lothlorien’s wine

Drinking yourself clever

lothlorien.jpg The List does not list wines, even good ones, we are only about food...at this stage anyway... But for these guys we are making an exception for the very reason that in 1971, a bunch of savvy young idealists bought 100 acres of land in the Ahuroa Valley, and shortly afterwards some of them realised they could do something quite delightful with their large feijoa crops.

We know Logan, director and winemaker personally, therefore we know firsthand the ethos behind Lothlorien’s production. He (as well as the company) is extremely environmentally aware, a devout organic foodie, and heavily into sustainability. The wine is 100% organic certified.

It’s also mighty delicious, and always our first choice in feijoa wine. The wine itself comes in three styles: dry, medium and reserve (or premium), but they also do a Feioja and Honey Liquer (using organic Manuka honey), an Apple and Feijoa Juice, and what they’ve dubbed the Poor Man’s Orange Juice, which is actually grapefruit juice.

All of their products are available at the Matakana Farmer’s Market every Saturday morning in Warkworth, but you’ll also find them in any good liquor outlet around the country. Bulk orders can be made via the website (we like these).
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