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Omaha Organic Blueberries

A dose of blueberry

OOB organic blueberries There’s so much to say about OOB, about their brand, their products and their philosophy.

The berries are grown in an organic blueberry orchard in Omaha north of Auckland by owners, Robert and Shannon Auton, who believe there is a place for quality organic products in a competitive food market, where quality, taste and health are important to the consumer. Organic fruit is likely to be higher in vitamins and minerals as the fruit has not been drained of their goodness through the use of chemicals or genetic engineering. OOB plants are fertilised using organic chicken manure.

OOB blueberries, strawberries, juice, ice cream and sorbet are Assure Quality Organic Certified.

Blueberries are one of nature’s antioxidant powerhouses. The Blueberry has more antioxidant power than almost any other food, including greater than that of Kale and Broccoli. Half a cup of Blueberries a day packs the antioxidant punch of 5+ a day of other fruits and vegetables.

There are a myriad of uses for the blueberry and you can buy OOB’s berries fresh or frozen. They are great as a snack or as an addition to almost meal.
Fruit / Berries / Omaha Organic Blueberries

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