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Purebread's bread

Bread, pure and simple

Purebread2 Purebread is all about producing bread that is safe for you, good for you, and tastes good.

Purebread founder, Robert Glensor lives and bakes a philosophy that believes organic is better for you and better for the environment. It’s a philosophy that’s hard to argue with, even if you’re not fanatic about organic. He stands behind the quality and goodness of his bread.

Their Paraoa bakehouse is an award winning store selling products that are 100% certified organic. That means that any ingredients for their products that they source, which don’t have similar organic certification, producers need to show GE free credentials.

Today Paraoa produces a range of over 30 organic and gluten free foods that has extended from breads and pizza bases, to include everything from nutritious organic breakfast cereals to tasty cakes and biscuits under the Purebread brand, the Gluten Free Goodies Company and 4 Ever Free.

Everything about Purebread has grown since its inception in 1996, the bakery equipment is bigger and brighter, and the brown paper bag may have changed, but what's inside is still delicious, pure and simple.
  • 04 902 9696
Bakery / Bread / Purebread's bread

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