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Greytown Butchery

One of the oldest and one of the best

Greytown Butchery shop1 Greytown is a neat little strip town just past the turn-off to Martinborough between Featherston and Carterton in the Wairarapa. Gavin and Julie decided Greytown needed more than just a country butchery and Gavin having come back from Sydney where he learnt a lot from Greek and Italian butchers along with fine art of organics. He trained in making continental sausages, salamis and other smallgoods.

The shop was started in 1873 but Gavin and Julie purchased it in 2006. It is probably the oldest continuous butcher shops and one of the few thriving in a small town. Here, now, you can buy an impressive range from standard beef, lamb and pork all farmed ethically. There’s free range and organic chicken much of which is ready to cook. You can buy game of almost any type including venison, rabbit, hare, ostrich, quail, pheasant, and kangaroo. You can get the best fish available along with duck, turkey and pousson. It’s hard to imagine what else you’d want from a butchery.

Oh, yes, they’re certified suppliers to other outlets ensuring they produce and you get the best possible products.
www.greytownbutchery.co.nz Gavin and Julie Green
Butchery / Greytown Butchery

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